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Battle at 96

November 16 - November 17

Battle at 96

This is a supported EFR event. Contact Ranger Rick Holgate for specific information. Attached is information about the original battle (where the first Patriot in the South was killed) and the Registration Form.  This was an event that Whig and Loyalist Militias fought in so there would be no uniforms, just what Militia of the day wore.  It has been a fun event Rick has done for the past 2 years.  He plans leave on Thursday the 14th and stay just outside Savannah that night then go on in and set up on Friday.  Leaving Sunday after break down and stopping again outside Savannah and continuing back Monday morning. If someone wants to ride up with him, he should have room for another Ranger and gear.

Battle of 96 registration

Background Information on the Battle:

The build up to the battle stretches a few months before hand, and includes men such as William Henry Drayton, and Robert and Patrick Cunningham. Eventually, the Patriots sent a shipment of gunpowder and lead to the Cherokee in hopes of keeping them neutral. This shipment however was set upon and captured by the Loyalist who claimed it was supposed to be used for a Loyalist massacre. The gossip spreads and more people joined the loyalist par

At daybreak on November 19, Williamson and Mayson arrived at Ninety Six. There began the construction of a fortification on the ridge overlooking the town and the Spring Branch. Using the outbuildings located there they added breastworks between the buildings of fence rails, hides, and hay bales. That same day around 11:00 am the loyalist troops of Majors Joseph Robinson and Patrick Cunningham arrived and took control of the town and the jail.

While discussions were underway for terms of peace, two of the patriots who were standing outside of the fort were seized by loyalists. Williamson’s orders for the two to be rescued resulted in the first shots being fired from the fort. For two and a half hours heavy firing continued, slackening only when night fell. The next morning the intense firing resumed. During this day the Loyalist attempted to burn the Patriots out by setting the field and fort on fire, but neither attempt was successful. Once again when night fell the firing tapered off, to pick up again in the morning. By this point the Patriots began digging a well in the fort, as they had been without water for two days. They were also beginning to run short on food and ammunition, the latter which Williamson attempted to hide from his men.
At dusk on the third day the Loyalists waved a white flag from the jail to signify for a parley. The two sides agreed that at 8:00 the next morning they would meet to discuss terms. Representing the Patriots was Williamson, Mayson, John Bowie, and Andrew Pickens. The Loyalists were represented by Robinson, Cunningham, McLourin, and Richard Pearis. By the end of the day terms for peace had been agreed on, and the battle was over. The resulting casualties of the battle were one death on each side, Patriot James Birmingham and Loyalist Captain Luper, along with 12 Patriots and 52 Loyalist wounded.

After the Battle of Ninety Six Colonel Richard Richardson arrived in the backcountry on his expedition to end loyalist support. During this time some of the Loyalist leaders were captured, while others such as Patrick Cunningham were able to elude capture and flee. This expedition became known as the Snow Campaign as during it a storm dumped 15 inches of snow in the area. The Snow Campaign ended serious loyalist support in the backcountry for the next several years, until the capture of Charleston in 1780.

Details

Start:
November 16
End:
November 17
Event Categories:
,

Organizer

East Florida Rangers, Inc.
Email:
cathysopher@verizon.net
Website:
http://www.eastfloridarangers.org/

Venue

Ninety Six National Historic Site
1103 Hwy 248
Ninety Six, SC 29666 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
(864)-543-4068
Website:
https://www.nps.gov/nisi/index.htm